Monatian: Phonology

Another day of doing nothing follows… I am still struggling to create an orthography for my language. However, the phonology is finished. The consonants are the following:

N, Ɲ, Ŋ, T, D, Ʈ, Ç, K, G, Q, Θ, Ð, S, ʃ, Ʒ, H, R, Rr, L, J

And the vowels are as follows:

I, Y, Ɯ, I, E, Ø, O, Ə, A, Ä, ɒ

I cannot help but wish I had considered the names of the amino acids and nucleotides while creating this language, because the faction for which these would be used is the (alter?) ego and represents my intellectual drive, knowledge without concerns that the super-ego would provide, and the general archetype of, “evil genius,” with the evil being a disregard for ethics and morality. It will take some unusual creativity on my part to rename the current amino acids and nucleotides in such a way that they can be written using these letters. I even managed to get the pronouns determined in this table:

Singular Plural
1st 2nd 3rd 1st 2nd 3rd
Absolutive ÇØ DY,ΘY IL,ƏL,OL NY ƷY,SY RrO,ƮO,LO
Ergative QIØ ƮƜ,ΘƜ EL,ÄL,ɒL ƷƜ,SƜ RrÄ,ƮÄ,LÄ
Genitive Ɲɒ Dɒ,Θɒ SLɒ,STɒ,SKɒ NYɒ Ʒɒ,Sɒ SLɒRr,STɒT,STɒK
Dative ÄÇØ ÄÐƜ,AΘƜ ÄLIL,ATƏL,AKOL ÄNØ ÄƷY,AʃY ÄRrO,AƮO,ALO
Ablative DɪØ DɒTƜ,DɒΘƜ DIEL,DƜAL,DOɒL DɪNƜ DØƷY,DØSY DRrO,DAƮO,DLO

When spoken, some of it evokes the French pronoun system, but this is probably a consequence of the similarities between the Romance languages. Some (such as ÇØ) evoke the Spanish pronouns as well, which should be expected. This will probably be final, and I am going to take steps to ensure that pronouns are almost always written, so there will be a departure from the rather Latin conjugations and spellings. Take the basic present indicative conjugations of the verb IRE, meaning to go, to travel, to move below:

Singular Plural
1st YEO YALOŊ
2nd YALEƷ
3rd YA YALENT

It can be seen that the 1st person singular ends in the o vowel, which was taken from Latin because of the quantity of the vowel. The usage of similar vowels of different length was taken from a brief spark of creativity, although it seems familiar. Note that the Y is actually a vowel that sounds something like a cross between V and a W without the movements of the lips. The fundamental premise of the alphabet was a language without labial consonants, so something had to replace at least some of them. Regardless, the plural conjugations do sound like horrible amalgamations of French and Latin, but this is my first (non-English code) constructed language and first serious burst of interest in linguistics. The next irregular verb, ERE, which is defined as to be, to exist, to be present, follows the Latin definition more because it can be used for constructs stating, “There is a…” Here are its conjugations:

Singular Plural
1st SɪO SƜNOŊ
2nd ɪS ɪSTIƷ
3rd ɪST SELENT

You may immediately notice the parallels without my assistance. However, I dislike SELENT. It suggests a verbing [sic] of the adjective lunar. If I shorten it to SENT, it will suggest feeling or judging instead. More research will be needed for this problem, but note the distinct French touch on the otherwise Latin-based spellings. SɪO remains a problem due to the pronunciation difficulties. The ɪ would definitely suggest I, but to use I seems to make the basic form of the verb too distinct from the others. This is a verb that requires improvement. It probably is not as bad as my attempt to combine the verbs for to have and to hold (HENYER).

Singular Plural
1st HENYO HENYOŊ
2nd HENYES HENYEƷ
3rd HENYET HENYENT

Even pronouncing henuere is already terrible enough, but this one produces a regular conjugation out of that. Perhaps, I should keep the verbs for habere and tenere separate, although it seemed nice when I first thought of the idea.

YIDERE (to see). The next verb, YIDERE, should be obvious to anyone who remembers that the Y is not a consonant and is not pronounced like a front vowel.

Singular Plural
1st YIDO YIDOŊ
2nd YIDES YIDEƷ
3rd YIDET YIDENT

I felt I could not get more blatant than uido (–> vido –> video), but transcribing the word as uido would cause confusion with fido, in which the root of fid- has an obvious meaning.

I already feel better now. Critiquing my own work severely and honestly has always been intellectually stimulating and keeps me from accumulating too much hubris.

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